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WKRP in Cincinnati – The Complete First Season (Boxset) (DVD USED)

WKRP in Cincinnati – The Complete First Season (Boxset) (DVD USED) Price Comparison

iNetVideo.com
$ 15.99
+ $ 4.95 shipping
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Virtual Clinical Excursions for Fundamentals of Nursing – With CD [Used]

Virtual Clinical Excursions for Fundamentals of Nursing – With CD [Utilised] Price Comparison

Textbooks.com
$ 38.97
+ $ .00 shipping
Textbooks.com
$ 54.55
+ $ .00 shipping
Textbooks.com Marketplace
$ 5.00
+ $ three.99 shipping
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The Roy Rogers Collection – 20 Movie Pack (Boxset) (DVD USED)

The Roy Rogers Collection – 20 Movie Pack (Boxset) (DVD Utilized) Greatest Prices

iNetVideo.com
$ 12.49
+ $ four.95 shipping
Loved ones Video
$ 6.99
+ $ 1.99 shipping
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Monkey With 72 Magic / Ninja Untouchables (DVD USED)

Monkey With 72 Magic / Ninja Untouchables (DVD Employed) Cost Comparison

iNetVideo.com
$ 4.99
+ $ two.95 shipping
iNetVideo.com
$ four.99
+ $ 2.95 shipping
MovieMars.com
$ 8.89
+ $ .00 shipping
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TV Shows We Used To Watch – 1970′s British TV show – Love thy Neighbour

TV Shows We Used To Watch – 1970′s British TV show – Love thy Neighbour


Image by brizzle born and bred
‘Love Thy Neighbour’ was a popular British sitcom, which was aired from April 13, 1972, until January 22, 1976, spanning seven series.

The sitcom was produced by Thames Television and broadcast by ITV. The main cast included Jack Smethurst, Rudolph Walker, Nina Baden-Semper and Kate Williams. In 1973, the series was adapted into a movie, with a sequel series set in Australia. The series was created and largely written by Vince Powell and Harry Driver, and was based around a suburban white working class couple who unwittingly found themselves living next door to a black couple, and the white couple’s attempts to come to terms with this.

Love Thy Neighbour was hugely popular in the 1970s. During that era, Britain struggled to come to terms with its recently-arrived population of black immigrants, and Love Thy Neighbour exemplified this struggle. It aroused great controversy for many of the same reasons as the earlier Till Death Us Do Part.

The views of the white male character (Eddie Booth, played by Smethurst) were presented in such a way as to make him appear stupid and bigoted, and were contrasted with the more tolerant attitude of his wife.

His use of terms such as nig-nog to refer to his black neighbour, despite being intended as ironic by the script-writers, attracted considerable criticism from viewers. The male black character was, in contrast educated and sophisticated, although stubborn and also capable of racism using the terms Honky, Snowflake, Paleface or Big White Chief to describe his white neighbour.

The series has since been repeated on satellite television stations in the UK, however, each episode begins with a warning about content at the start of each show.

Eddie Booth (Jack Smethurst) is a white socialist. His world is turned on its head when Bill and Barbie Reynolds move in next door. He is even more annoyed when Bill gets a job at the same factory as him, and refers to him as a "nig-nog", "Sambo", "choc-ice" or "King Kong".

He also has a tendency to call Chinese, Pakistanis or Indians names like "Fu Manchu", "Gunga Din" and "Ali Baba". He is a very devoted supporter of Manchester United Football Club. His catchphrases include "Bloody Nora!", "Knickers!", "The subject is closed", "you bloody nig-nog!" and "Get knotted!"

Joan Booth (Kate Williams) is Eddie’s wife. She does not share her bigoted husband’s opinion of their black neighbours, and is good friends with Barbie. Her catchphrases include "Don’t be ridiculous!" and "Don’t talk rubbish!".

Bill Reynolds (Rudolph Walker) is a West Indian and a Conservative. Whenever Eddie tries to outdo him, Bill usually ends up having the last laugh. He occasionally refers to Eddie as a "white honky" and "snowflake", and doesn’t like catching Eddie staring at his wife.

He also has a very high-pitched laugh. His catchphrases include "Hey, honky!", "Cobblers!" and "You talking to me, snowflake?".

Barbie Reynolds (Nina Baden-Semper) is Bill’s wife and gets along very well with her next door neighbour, Joan Booth. Eddie is sometimes fascinated by her, especially in the pilot episode when she bent over while wearing hot pants.

Jacko Robinson (Keith Marsh) is an elderly white man and socialist who works with Bill and Eddie. His catchphrase is "I’ll have half", in reference to a half pint of beer.

Arthur Thomas (Tommy Godfrey) is another of Eddie and Bill’s co-workers at the factory, and is often seen in the local pub playing cards and talking about trade union issues.

Love Thy Neighbour has been criticised for its politically incorrect handling of issues of race, although its writers have claimed that each episode included both anti-white and anti-black sentiment.

It is often used as shorthand for television before the era of political correctness. Although both characters were bigoted and intolerant, Bill usually had the last laugh and rarely got his comeuppance.

See ‘Love Thy Neighbour’ Video Clip

www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_gN7zlpnz8

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TV Shows We Used To Watch – BBC British TV 1966 – Cathy Come Home

TV Shows We Used To Watch – BBC British TV 1966 – Cathy Come Home


Image by brizzle born and bred
Cathy Come Home was a BBC television drama by Jeremy Sandford, produced by Tony Garnett and directed by Ken Loach.

Filmed in a gritty, realistic drama documentary style, it was first broadcast on 16 November 1966 on BBC1.

The play was shown in the BBC’s The Wednesday Play anthology strand, which was well known for tackling social issues.

The play tells the story of a young couple, Cathy (played by Carol White) and Reg (Ray Brooks). Initially their relationship flourishes and they have a child and move into a modern home.

When Reg is injured and loses his well-paid job, they are evicted by bailiffs, and they face a life of poverty and unemployment, illegally squatting in empty houses and staying in shelters. Finally, Cathy has her children taken away by social services.

The play was watched by 12 million people — a quarter of the British population at the time — on its first broadcast. It broached issues that were not then widely discussed in the popular media, such as homelessness, unemployment, and the rights of mothers to keep their own children. It may have helped to influence changes in British law and in public opinion about these social issues.

It also helped raise the profile of the issue of homelessness. The film is often wrongly seen as influencing the founding of the charity for the homeless Shelter shortly after first broadcast but in actuality this was a coincidence.

However, the large audience for this programme and the influence it had on the British population led to great support for Shelter moving from being a small organisation to one with a national reach.

As Shelter states: "Watched by 12 million people on its first broadcast, the film alerted the public, the media, and the government to the scale of the housing crisis, and Shelter gained many new supporters."

The play was written by Jeremy Sandford, produced by Tony Garnett and directed by Ken Loach, who went on to become a major figure in British film. Loach employed a realistic documentary style, using predominantly 16mm film on location, which contrasted with the vast amount of BBC drama of the time which was commonly made in the electronic television studio.

Union regulations of the time though forced about ten minutes of Cathy Come Home to be shot in this way; film crews were smaller. The material shot on electronic cameras was telerecorded and spliced into the film as required.

Loach’s realistic style helped to heighten the play’s impact, particularly the scene in which Cathy and Reg are forcibly evicted with their children by bailiffs from the home in which they have been unable to keep up rent payments.

This powerful sequence, largely improvised, is often repeated in the UK in documentaries both about UK television history and the changing awareness of social issues in the 1960s.

In 1999, four years before the writer’s death, Cathy Come Home topped a British Film Institute poll as the most important single play ever made for television. Sandford might have reflected that many battles had been fought to bring it to the screen, but many more were needed just to begin tackling the issue that had become his own cause célèbre.

In a 2000 poll of industry professionals conducted by the British Film Institute to determine the 100 Greatest British Television Programmes of the 20th century, Cathy Come Home was voted second, the highest-placed drama on the list, behind the comedy Fawlty Towers. In 2003, it was released on VHS and DVD by the BFI as part of their Archive Television range but is now out of print.

In 2006 the film was re-shown for the first time in many years (on BBC Four), as part of a series highlighting the issue of homelessness. It, along with other Loach films, is currently available to watch on Loach’s YouTube channel.

Written by Jeremy Sandford
Directed by Ken Loach
Starring Carol White & Ray Brooks

Carol White (1 April 1943 – 16 September 1991) was a British actress. Born in Hammersmith, London, the daughter of a scrap merchant’s daughter, White attended the Corona Stage Academy.

She achieved notability for her performances in the television play Cathy Come Home (1966) and the films Poor Cow (1967) and I’ll Never Forget What’s'isname (1967), but alcoholism and drug abuse damaged her career, and from the early 1970s she worked infrequently.

Ray Brooks (born 20 April 1939 in Brighton, East Sussex) is an English actor possibly best known for his narration work for children’s TV show Mr Benn.

Ray Brooks began as a television actor. He appeared in the long-running soap Coronation Street and played Terry Mills in the series Taxi with Sid James (1963). He then rose to prominence in the UK after starring alongside Michael Crawford and Rita Tushingham in The Knack …and How to Get It.

The film, directed by Richard Lester won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival in 1965. Brooks followed up this success starring in the groundbreaking television drama Cathy Come Home.

Through the 1960s Brooks also had small roles in a number of cult television series including The Avengers, Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased), Danger Man, Doomwatch. He played the major role of David Campbell in the Doctor Who film Daleks – Invasion Earth 2150 AD.

Major film roles in the 1970s were less numerous; among his roles was a supporting part in comedy Carry On Abroad (1972). In this decade he built a career doing voiceovers for television advertisements. He also released an album of his own songs.

See video clip

www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8fVnXXMw60&ob=av1e

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TV Shows We Used To Watch – 1955 Television advertising

TV Shows We Used To Watch – 1955 Television advertising


Image by brizzle born and bred
When ITV launched on 22 September 1955, the BBC’s television service had been running unchallenged for almost two decades and was fast gaining popularity.

Less than fifteen months before the first television commercial appeared on British screens, on July 4th 1954, the Minister of Fuel and Power, Geoffrey Lloyd, burned a large replica of a ration book at an open meeting in his constituency to herald the official end of fourteen years of rationing in Britain. The dawning of a new age of prosperity was upon the British public. From a retailers point of view the start of commercial television could not have been better timed.

At 8pm, on September 22, 1955, ITV broadcast its first television programme. Its first advertisement came 12 minutes later advertising Gibbs SR Toothpaste. That first programme is now almost completely forgotten. But the first advertisement has acquired iconic status.

See video clip

www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSSpugVNQD4

The USA’s first television advertisement was broadcast July 1, 1941. The watchmaker Bulova paid for a placement on New York station WNBT before a baseball game between the Brooklyn Dodgers and Philadelphia Phillies. The 10-second spot displayed a picture of a clock superimposed on a map of the United States, accompanied by the voice-over "America runs on Bulova time."

ITV Facts

* The BBC tried to strangle ITV at birth on 22 September 1955 by killing off Grace Archer, a leading character in the radio series, The Archers.

* ITV’s launch night was marked with a lavish banquet at London Guildhall, where the menu included clear turtle soup, lobster chablis and roast grouse washed down with 1947 Krug.

* ITV went live at 7.15pm on 22 September 1955, with a line-up including the Hallé Orchestra playing Elgar’s Cockaigne Suite and an excerpt from The Importance of Being Earnest, starring Sir John Gielgud.

* The first full day of transmission was on 23 September, and included the weather presented by Squadron-Leader Laurie West.

* ITV had the first female newsreader on British TV, Barbara Mandell, who read the news on the second day on air.

* Before ITV launched, Lord Reith, the founder of the BBC, compared "sponsored broadcasting" to smallpox, bubonic plague and the Black Death (all of which were introduced to England from overseas).

* Opponents of commercial television were incensed when American TV coverage of the Coronation was interrupted for an ad break featuring a celebrity chimp, J Fred Muggs. A clause was included in the commercial television Bill banning ad breaks from broadcasts featuring the Royal Family.

* More words were spoken in Parliament about whether a law allowing commercial television should be passed than are contained in the New Testament.

* The Broadcasting Bill was given Royal Assent on 30 July 1954, paving the way for a new independent television service supervised by the Independent Television Authority.

* Household cleaning products were the most advertised products in ITV’s first five years.

* Adverts were placed in the press inviting applications from prospective programme contractors on 25 August 1954, attracting 25 replies.

* It is a myth that Sidney and Cecil Bernstein, the founders of Granada TV, chose to set up their company in the North, because it rained more, so they thought people would stay in to watch more TV.

* Lew Grade’s ATV consortium, which held ITV licences in London and the Midlands, changed the face of television entertainment. But the ITA turned down the impresario’s first application for a franchise, fearing it would give him too much clout.

* The first advert shown on ITV was at 8.12pm on its launch night for Gibbs SR toothpaste. At the time, more than a third of the population never brushed their teeth.

* ITV was the home of the first US TV shows to be broadcast in the UK, including I Love Lucy and the A-Team.

* Granada needed two transmitters for the northern region to serve both sides of the Pennines, but while the Lancashire transmitter was ready in time for launch night on 3 May 1956, the Yorkshire side was delayed until November.

* In the early days of ITV, the actors’ union Equity refused to allow repeats so, if a show was repeated, the actors had to perform it all over again.

* An Oxford postgraduate called Somerset Plantagenet Fry became a celebrity as the first contestant on the quiz show Double Your Money’s Treasure Trail in 1955.

* In 1958 Granada covered the Rochdale by-election, the first election to be shown on British television.

* Sunday Night At The London Palladium was one of ITV’s most successful shows. At its height in 1958, when it was presented by Bruce Forsyth, it was watched by 28 million people.

* Armchair Theatre, run by Sydney Newman, brought original plays to a broad audience, but in 1958 one of the cast died as Underground was being transmitted. The play went on.

* Gone With The Wind star Vivien Leigh made her TV debut on ITV in 1959, in a production of Thornton Wilder’s play The Skin of Our Teeth.

* The first episode of Coronation Street was broadcast on 9 December 1960. Writer Tony Warren originally called it Florizel Street and it almost became Jubilee Street.

* In 1962, the Pilkington report was highly critical of ITV and suggested the licence to run the third channel should be awarded to the BBC.

* In 1965, the ban on advertising cigarettes resulted in an £8m loss of revenue for ITV.

* ITV switched from black and white to colour in November 1969, prompting employees to strike for a pay increase for operating the new system.

* The Beatles made their TV debut in a live performance for People and Places, from Manchester on 17 October 1962.

* ITV’s first major ratings clash with the BBC was on 20 July 1969, when the two went head to head with their live coverage of the first man on the Moon.

* The tape of ITV’s coverage of the Moon landing has since been erased, along with many other programmes of the 1960s and 1970s, so it could be reused.

* In 1968, London Weekend Television acquired the rights to the one-day cricket contest, the Gillette Cup. The MCC was furious when ITV interrupted play for ads. The MCC took cricket back to the BBC, prompting an ITV lawsuit.

* ‘Pop Stars’ presenter ‘Nasty’ Nigel Lythgoe made his first television appearance as a dancer on Sunday Night At The London Palladium.

* Robin Hood was brought to ITV by Hannah Weinstein, who had fled the US in the McCarthy era and employed other blacklisted Hollywood talent to make a show about a character who redistributed wealth from the rich to the poor.

* ITV pioneered the concept of the studio panel to discuss football matches during the 1970 Mexico World Cup.

* Richard Burton was one of the backers for HTV’s successful bid for the ITV franchise in Wales in 1967.

* ITV hoped to set up a second terrestrial channel like the BBC, but its hopes were dashed by the 1977 Annan report into the future of broadcasting.

* Lew Grade tried to keep down the cost of employing Roger Moore in The Saint by telling him episodes would last half an hour rather than an hour.

* The name of The Avengers’ character Emma Peel was an expression of what the producers were looking for – M[an] Appeal.

* Mindful of impact, in the making of Jesus of Nazareth, Lew Grade asked: "Why are there only 12 apostles?"

* The Sweeney was the first police drama to be shot on location in real streets rather than in the studio.

* It takes longer to watch ITV’s 13-part 1981 costume drama Brideshead Revisited than it does to read Evelyn Waugh’s novel.

* The US oil companies who usually sponsored ITV’s big dramas at first would not back Jewel In The Crown, saying India was too far away for the US audience.

* In 1973, the ITA banned a World In Action programme about the business affairs of bankrupt architect John Poulson, uniting The Sunday Times and Socialist Worker in a campaign against censorship.

* The South Bank Show first aired in 1978. When writer Richard Curtis applied to work for it, he was not even shortlisted.

* Greg Dyke was hired as editor-in-chief of TV-am in May 1983, when the new show was engaged in a frantic battle with BBC Breakfast and had just 800,000 viewers.

* City analysts reckon ITV’s first unsuccessful foray into digital , OnDigital, had losses of up to £1m a day. Even rebranding it as ITV Digital, with a campaign featuring a woolly monkey, couldn’t save it from going bust in 2002.

* In the first Pop Idol final, which pitted Will Young against Gareth Gates, on 9 Feburary 2002, the public cast 8.7 million votes and BT said the volume of calls had threatened the network.

* Bryan Ferry has admitted to being a fan of Footballers’ Wives. He said the show was: "Wonderful! All these trashy women wandering around done up to the nines. I love it."

* The final of the first series of I’m A Celebrity… Get Me Out Of Here inspired some to recreate their own jungles. B&Q reported a 30 per cent rise in online sales of deck chairs, barbecues and garden arches.

* Nearly 13 milion viewers tuned in to watch Ken and Deidre Barlow get remarried on Coronation Street in April 2005; 7 million saw Charles wed Camilla the following day.

* Royal Mail is releasing stamps to mark the 50th birthday, but Kevin Whately’s image has had to be cut from the Inspector Morse stamp, as no one living, apart from the Royal Family, is allowed to appear on UK stamps.

* Nearly 90% of people watching timeshifted shows fast-forward the ads, but TV remains the most memorable form of advertising.

* Prior to the 1980s music in television advertisements was generally limited to jingles and incidental music; on some occasions lyrics to a popular song would be changed to create a theme song or a jingle for a particular product. In 1971 the converse occurred when a song written for a Coca-Cola advertisement was re-recorded as the pop single "I’d Like to Teach the World to Sing" by the New Seekers, and became a hit. Some pop and rock songs were re-recorded by cover bands for use in advertisements, but the cost of licensing original recordings for this purpose remained prohibitive until the late 1980s.

The use of previously-recorded popular songs in television advertisements began in earnest in 1985 when Burger King used the original recording of Aretha Franklin’s song "Freeway of Love" in a television advertisement for the restaurant. This also occurred in 1987 when Nike used the original recording of The Beatles’ song "Revolution" in an advertisement for athletic shoes. Since then, many classic popular songs have been used in similar fashion.

Songs can be used to concretely illustrate a point about the product being sold (such as Bob Seger’s "Like a Rock" used for Chevy trucks), but more often are simply used to associate the good feelings listeners had for the song to the product on display. In some cases the original meaning of the song can be totally irrelevant or even completely opposite to the implication of the use in advertising; for example Iggy Pop’s "Lust for Life", a song about heroin use addiction, has been used to advertise Royal Caribbean International, a cruise ship line. Music-licensing agreements with major artists, especially those that had not previously allowed their recordings to be used for this purpose, such as Microsoft’s use of "Start Me Up" by the Rolling Stones and Apple Inc.’s use of U2′s "Vertigo" became a source of publicity in themselves.

In early instances, songs were often used over the objections of the original artists, who had lost control of their music publishing the music of Beatles being perhaps the most well-known case; more recently artists have actively solicited use of their music in advertisements and songs have gained popularity and sales after being used in advertisements. A famous case is Levi’s company, which has used several one hit wonders in their advertisements (songs such as "Inside", "Spaceman", and "Flat Beat").

Sometimes a controversial reaction has followed the use of some particular song on an advertisement. Often the trouble has been that people do not like the idea of using songs that promote values important for them in advertisements. For example Sly and the Family Stone’s anti-racism song, "Everyday People", was used in a car advertisement, which angered among people.

Generic scores for advertisements often feature clarinets, saxophones, or various strings (such as the acoustic/electric guitars and violins) as the primary instruments.

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, electronica music was increasingly used as background scores for television advertisements, initially for automobiles, and later for other technological and business products such as computers and financial services.

* Top 10 most controversial ads see link below

news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/7373667.stm

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TV Shows We Used To Watch – BBC Juke Box Jury 1959-67

TV Shows We Used To Watch – BBC Juke Box Jury 1959-67


Image by brizzle born and bred
Classic 1950s and 60s pop music show in which a panel votes hit or miss on the new releases they are played. David Jacobs presents, with Nina and Frederick, Jill Ireland and David McCallum on the panel.

The show – in which assorted celebrities rated new single releases a ‘hit’ or a ‘miss’ – began on US Television in 1948 starring Hollywood DJ Peter Potter.

One of the highlights of the show’s history was when The Beatles appeared on December 7th 1963. They rated songs by artists including Billy Fury, Elvis Presley and The Swinging Blue Jeans – all of which became hits.

On the night, seven of the Beatles’ predictions were right and three were wrong.

The show’s format was very simple: a panel of four guests would listen to a batch of the latest pop singles and judge them a hit or a miss.

The fact that the programme was performance-free meant that during a song the camera would pan around the studio audience, linger on the celebrity panel or cut back to the show’s host, originally the DJ David Jacobs, to no great purpose.

Despite this lack of visual interest, the show proved extremely popular, with a weekly audience peaking at around 12 million, while an appearance by the Rolling Stones as the panellists attracted 10,000 requests for tickets for the programme’s recording.

The most famous guests to appear on the show were The Beatles, who generated such pandemonium that the audience drowned out much of what they said.

It was axed towards the end of 1967 after falling ratings, but revived on two occasions, the first time with Noel Edmonds as presenter (in 1979), and the second time with
Jools Holland (from 1989 to 1990). The theme music for the show was called
"Hit and Miss" and was performed by "The John Barry Seven".

The following clip is a section from a programme in 1960.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=b3y-wNnh3g0

Nina and Frederik were a Danish popular singing duo of the late 1950s and early 1960s. Their repertoire consisted of a blend of folk music, calypsos and standards. The duo consisted of Frederik, Baron van Pallandt and his wife at the time Nina van Pallandt.

Nina and Frederik began singing together at the age of four, but since Frederik’s father was the Dutch ambassador to Denmark, his family moved away and the children lost contact with each other. However in 1957 he re-established contact with Nina at her parents home and one evening played his guitar for her. To his surprise Nina began singing to it, and it was at that moment that they decided to sing together. Originally they sang only for their friends, and occasionally at house parties. This led to them being asked to perform at charity shows and soon they were in demand professionally. On 1 July 1957, the duo made their professional show business debut in Copenhagen’s top night club, Mon Coeur. Within a matter of months they had become great favourites throughout Europe. They married in September 1960 and in 1961 had their own series on British Television, Nina and Frederik at home.

Their earliest known single was "Jamaica Farewell"/"Come Back Liza", both Calypso songs, issued in 1959 on Pye International 7N 25021, but showing a 1957 ‘recording first published’ date.

Their album, Nina and Frederik, charted at number 9 on the UK Albums Chart in February 1960. Their follow-up collection, also entitled Nina and Frederik, but featuring completely different songs, peaked at number 11 in the UK chart in May 1961.

In 1963 they spent three weeks performing at the Savoy Hotel, and in December of the same year they gave a concert at the Royal Festival Hall, and made guest appearances on the panel of Juke Box Jury.

Jill Ireland and David McCallum

David Keith McCallum, Jr. (born 19 September 1933) is a Scottish actor and musician. He is best known for his roles as Illya Kuryakin, a Russian-born secret agent, in the 1960s television series The Man from U.N.C.L.E., as interdimensional operative Steel in Sapphire & Steel, and Dr. Donald "Ducky" Mallard in the series NCIS.

He was married to actress Jill Ireland from 1957 to 1967. They had three sons: Paul, Jason – an adopted son who died from an accidental drug overdose in 1989 – and Valentine. He introduced Ireland to Charles Bronson when both were filming The Great Escape. A few years later, she left McCallum and married Bronson.

He has been married to Katherine Carpenter since 1967. They have a son, Peter, and a daughter, Sophie. David and Katherine McCallum are active with charitable organizations that support the United States Marine Corps: Katherine’s father was a Marine who served in the Battle of Iwo Jima, and her brother lost his life in the Vietnam War.

David and Katherine McCallum live in New York.

Jill Dorothy Ireland (April 24, 1936 – May 18, 1990) was an English actress, best known for her many films with her second husband, Charles Bronson.

Ireland was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1984. After her diagnosis, Ireland wrote two books chronicling her battle with the disease (at the time of her death, she was writing a third book) and became a spokesperson for the American Cancer Society. In 1988, she testified before Congress about medical costs and was awarded the Medal of Courage from then-President Ronald Reagan.

On May 18, 1990, Ireland died of breast cancer at her home in Malibu, California.

For her contribution to the motion picture industry, Jill Ireland has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6751 Hollywood Boulevard.

In 1991, Jill Clayburgh portrayed Ireland in the made-for-television movie Reason for Living: The Jill Ireland Story, which told of her later years, including her fight with cancer.

David Lewis Jacobs CBE (born 19 May 1926) is a British actor and broadcaster who rose to prominence as presenter of the peak-time BBC Television show Juke Box Jury and of the BBC Radio 4 political forum, Any Questions?

Jacobs was born in London and educated at Strand School. He served in the Royal Navy from 1944 to 1947, and first broadcast on Navy Mixture in 1944. He became an announcer with the British Forces Broadcasting Service and was chief announcer on Radio SEAC in Ceylon (1945-47). He was later assistant-station director.

A BBC staff announcer in the early 1950s, his voice eerily intoned the title for many of the 53 episodes of the popular space adventure series Journey Into Space. He also played no fewer than 22 acting parts in the course of the series.

He also broadcast on Radio Luxembourg.

Jacobs became best known as presenter of Juke Box Jury on BBC television between 1959 and 1967. He was one of the four original presenters of Top of the Pops when it started in 1964. He had earlier, between 1957 and 1961, established the chart show format of the Light Programme’s Pick of the Pops, to which he briefly returned in 1962.

Between 1957 and 1966 Jacobs was the presenter of A Song for Europe and did the UK commentary at several Eurovision Song Contests. He hosted the popular panel game What’s My Line? when it was revived on BBC2 from 1973 to 1974. In 1973 he hosted a short-lived version of the American game show The Who, What, or Where Game.

From December 1967 until July 1983 Jacobs chaired the influential Radio 4 live topical debate programme Any Questions? One episode notoriously descended into chaos when some of the audience heckled Enoch Powell: they were evicted, and a stone was thrown through the stained-glass window of the church from which the programme was being broadcast. Jacobs later for a time presented a similar series called Questions for TVS.

Jacobs appeared as himself in the 1974 film Stardust, compèring a 1960s award ceremony. He also appeared as himself in an episode of the BBC sitcom Some Mothers Do ‘Ave ‘Em, where he played the presenter of a fictional home improvement show.

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