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China-8059 – Oriental Pearl TV Tower

China-8059 – Oriental Pearl Television Tower
tv

Image by archer10 (Dennis)
Oriental Pearl Television Tower, Shanghai, China

The Oriental Pearl Television Tower. This 468 meters high (1,536 feet) tower is the world’s third tallest Television and radio tower surpassed in height only by towers in Toronto, Canada and Moscow, Russia. Nonetheless, even much more alluring than its height is the tower’s unique architectural style that makes the Oriental Pearl Television Tower 1 of the most appealing locations anywhere.
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Thanks to every person for your thoughts and wishes at this time as I approach a main battle in my life (I feel). I will say whatever occurs I have had a full and amazing life and have no regrets, I am a quite lucky man. Have a great day and maintain smiling.

I do hope you will all fully grasp if I do not post a lot of photos or I quit for days at a time but I will attempt to keep you informed. I am also running out of photos LOL.

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the television tower in Berlin

the television tower in Berlin
television

Image by johnsam
This is the television tower in Berlin, Germany. You can also lift up on the tower go there and has a great view and there is a restaurant.

Fernsehturm / television tower (info):
The Fernsehturm (German for "television tower") is a television tower in the city centre of Berlin, Germany. The original total height of the tower was 365 metres (1198 feet), but it rose to 368 m (1207 ft)after the installation of a new antenna in the 1990s.
(Wikipedia)

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Žižkov Television Tower babies

Žižkov Television Tower babies
television

Image by activitystory
www.tower.cz/english/english.htm
Mimika!

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Project 366 2008 – February 19, 2008 – Tower at WKMG CBS Television Station ~

Project 366 2008 – February 19, 2008 – Tower at WKMG CBS Television Station ~
television

Image by turtlemom4bacon
050/366 – Project 366, February 19, 2008

Tower located in Orlando, Florida ~
Best viewed on LARGE or ORIGINAL for closer details of the stairs, etc. ~

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television tower

television tower
television

Image by yui.kubo
2007-12-15 Nagoya, Aichi, Japan
SONY Cyber-shot DSC-F88

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Television Tower

Television Tower
television

Image by [martin]
Berlin [?]

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television transmission tower

television transmission tower
television

Image by woodleywonderworks
What is the digital TV (DTV) transition?

The switch from analog to digital broadcast television is referred to as the digital TV (DTV) transition. In 1996, the U.S. Congress authorized the distribution of an additional broadcast channel to each broadcast TV station so that they could start a digital broadcast channel while simultaneously continuing their analog broadcast channel. Later, Congress has set June 12, 2009 as the final date that full-power television stations can broadcast in digital only. Your local broadcasters may make the transition before then, and some already have.

Why are we switching to DTV?

An important benefit of the switch to all-digital broadcasting is that it will free up parts of the valuable broadcast spectrum for public safety communications such as police, fire departments, and rescue squads. Also, some of the spectrum will be auctioned to companies that will be able to provide consumers with more advanced wireless services (such as wireless broadband).

Consumers also benefit because digital broadcasting allows stations to offer improved picture and sound quality, and digital is much more efficient than analog. For example, rather than being limited to providing one analog program, a broadcaster is able to offer a super sharp “high definition” (HD) digital program or multiple “standard definition” (SD) digital programs simultaneously through a process called “multicasting.” Multicasting allows broadcast stations to offer several channels of digital programming at the same time, using the same amount of spectrum required for one analog program. So, for example, while a station broadcasting in analog on channel 7 is only able to offer viewers one program, a station broadcasting in digital on channel 7 can offer viewers one digital program on channel 7-1, a second digital program on channel 7-2, a third digital program on channel 7-3, and so on. This means more programming choices for viewers. Further, DTV can provide interactive video and data services that are not possible with analog technology.

From:
www.dtv.gov/consumercorner.html

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