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Soul Train: The best of the seventies

A selection of clips from the 1970′s and 1980′s featuring interviews and performances from the era’s most well-liked artists. Global ImageWorks is exclusive worldwide clip licensing representative.

posted by in Variety Shows and have Comments (25)

25 Responses to “Soul Train: The best of the seventies”

  1. 2008HereICome says:

    @Ovarykill: I’m just trying to figure out your comment. There’s “great” music nowadays where? Why should a person have to LOOK for “great” music? Wouldn’t “great” music speak for itself and be readily available to be listened to. What is some of the “great” music you’re referring to?

  2. 2008HereICome says:

    @tommiexander: You are for real with your comment. Soul Train never picked back up and was the same as it was in the 70s after the 80s because that’s when STANK came on the scene. People no longer had respect for themselves or the music industry because it was all about sex and money. You can tell in the attire, the style of dancing, and the overall attitudes. The 80s was when women started dressing like prostitutes and men started piercing everything trying to be cute.

  3. TheVee909 says:

    ppl even dance better back then.

  4. ralphyization says:

    I LOVED that show, whenever I was at my cousin’s house! They had cable! he he!

  5. tommiexander says:

    @coolwafferman
    I am from the ol school and you are correct, Soul Train was at its best in the 70′s, but it was was doing pretty good until around the mid 80′s. But I most definitely disagree that Soul Train picked back up form 1987-1993. And I don’t think that many ol schoolers would agree with that either. The magic of Soul Train was gone by then. Rap and hip hop music destroyed the heart and soul of Soul Train.

  6. coolwafferman says:

    @tommiexander “Soul Train” was definitely on point from 1971-1977. By the late 70′s into the early 80′s, some of the funk they played was okay, but not as great as the 70′s. It really picked back up by 1987 when New Jack Swing became popular, and continued until around 1993.

  7. sewitt60 says:

    @xxbrknhartxx Why?

  8. basquait1 says:

    @djbigpean: You also forgot/forget that the Jewish producers got/continue to get the …FORTUNE! Peace….

  9. xxbrknhartxx says:

    i can’t believe people used to dress/dance like that o.o

  10. streeTkiDwannaBe says:

    Magic Johnson has bought soul train. I think it’s coming back.

  11. Ovarykill says:

    @eng081194 Do yourself a favor and don’t judge an entire generation. There’s great music, just look harder. If rap is all you see, you’re watching too much BET my friend. A ton of great music out there to find. Open your eyes my brother.

  12. gt2e says:

    @88keys33 we’re in the 21 first century

  13. eugenemusictv says:

    @eng081194 I AGREE BUT NOT ALL RAP MUSIC IS BAD I THINK IT’S A STEREOTYPE COMING FROM THE TIME NWA CAME OUT BUT I WISH I WAS BORN AROUND THIS ERA UGH

  14. 88keys33 says:

    @gt2e: I’m only speaking of a specific genre, R&B. I’m assuming by your mention of “modern music”, you are refering to the very broad subject of music of the 20th century. I would say that I am exposed to a lot of it, because I love music. Admittedly, I have my preferences, as everyone does. No harm meant; I just thought I’d share my thoughts.

  15. gt2e says:

    @88keys33 and just how much modern music are you actually exposed to ?? and im not talking about the charts,i think we can agree thats a load of shit mainly

  16. RealityContradiction says:

    @TallyOne Thanks! Much love and respect. Keep good music ALIVE!! :)

  17. 88keys33 says:

    @gt2e: Well, I have to admit that music now is very different from back then. I don’t think eng081194 is an idiot, and I understand his nostalgia. There was a totally different message in the R&B of the 70′s. As well, the talent level was quite different. Old R&B/Soul, as far as style and delivery, was closely related to Gospel because of the emotion displayed in the music. You don’t get that same emotion in the music of today. Of course times change, but it’s just not as meaningful.

  18. gt2e says:

    @eng081194 your an idiot,while there is some truth in what you say most of it is nostalgic bullshit you’re looking back through rose tinted glasses,you talk about gangs an heroin like its a modern day phenomenon get a grip you spastic

  19. fwagma says:

    i would like to know if anybody have a video of the two winners from new orleans
    winning the 1973 soul train contest if so please post it on youtube please

  20. TallyOne says:

    @RealityContradiction Ya know, I can agree with that. You make a good point. I like what you have to say. Im in my 20s too and I can see where youre coming from. I feel like I shouldnt have been so harsh in my posts. Im going to take down the last one. Thank you.

  21. RealityContradiction says:

    It’s terrible that people can watch a wonderful video like this and think of negativity. And racial comments. It’s NOT about race. It’s about musical history, and talent. My EARS hear great music…not my eyes!!!!!!

  22. RealityContradiction says:

    @TallyOne I kinda see what your saying about Genego trying to make rap seem as if it’s lets creative. You make a good point. HOWEVER, I don’t agree with what you stated about 25years from now, no one will remember these artists. Many of them are legends and will be remembered. Folks will keep their music alive. And I’m in my 20′s and I believe that..

  23. genego says:

    @TallyOne Rap is considerably less creative. It’s so generic that rappers have to put their own names in the lyrics just so you will know who is performing. In another 25 years people will still know Marvin, Aretha, Stevie, Smokey, The Temptations, Four Tops, Commodores, EWF, The Supremes and so on.. Not so the generic rap “artists”

  24. harveysuperboy says:

    @djbigpean Agree.

  25. Virpatrick says:

    @TallyOne I’m musician, I play many instruments, I was a teen when I started playing -yes, OLD days – With my band I enjoyed playing ‘ I’m black and I’m proud’ and (Tho music has no color) we all were white. Things got harder in order to catch those funky guitar riffs/bass lines & drum beats…not to tell you about singing!… we couldn’t reach that high tunes from James Brown, S Wonder etc. I’m not saying that Rap is cr*p… but far less difficult style in contrast to Funk R&B &co. Peace

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