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American Bandstand: Dick Clark and the Creating of a Rock ‘n’ Roll Empire

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3 Responses to “American Bandstand: Dick Clark and the Creating of a Rock ‘n’ Roll Empire”

  1. Anthony G Pizza "trivialtony" says:
    10 of 10 people found the following review helpful:
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Musical “Philadelphia Story” Retold in “Bandstand” Bio, October 6, 2000
    By 
    Anthony G Pizza “trivialtony” (FL) –
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    In his history of Dick Clark and “American Bandstand,” John Jackson had his choice of several stories. He could tell of Clark’s ascension to the “Bandstand” podium at a strategic time, hooking Clark, his host network (ABC), and host city (Philadelphia) to pop culture prominence. Jackson could chronicle the city’s fast-moving music scene, the teen singers, disc jockeys, and businessmen (Clark among them) who exploited the new music. Finally, he could tell the show’s own 32-year story, as “Bandstand” led, followed, then rehashed youth culture.

    Despite factual errors (putting “All You Need Is Love” on “Sgt. Pepper” shows as much Beatle knowledge as Jackson claimed Clark had) and unneeded 60s-70s rehash, Jackson’s biography adddresses its subjects accurately and engagingly. Jackson sees Clark not as money-grubbing villain but driven, opportunistic businessman who “within the bounds of propriety – followed the dollar wherever it took him.”

    Clark fought to cult!ivate, keep, and wield a pleasant national image to his advantage. Jackson succeeds most in showing how that image served, even saved Clark’s career. Clark’s soft-spoken, “nice guy” image eased the transition from the scandalous, tragic tenure of original “Bandstand” host Bob Horn. It softened and widened (some said, despite Clark’s objections, “whitened”) rock and roll’s ease into daily life and the youth buying power enjoining it. Mostly, it masked the clear-eyed, hard-charging figure who not only stood up to federal regulators and network bosses, but parlayed his “Bandstand” success into music-related (torn by 1959-60′s “payola” scandal, covered in depth here despite little Clark participation), then rebuilt into complete media-based success.

    Fans of early rock will enjoy Jackson’s musical side trips. He looks at the “Bandstand” dancers’ quick fame, the synergy and rivalry between the show, Philadelphia promoters, and disc jockeys, the rise of small record labels whi!ch (with Clark’s involvement throughout) recorded national hits (Jackson tells fresh versions of the making of “At The Hop” and “The Twist”), and, finally, Clark’s move to California which closed Philly music dominance (and, to believe Jackson, did little for “Bandstand,” either). Figures like musician Charlie Gracie, producer Tony Mammarella, and songwriters Kal Mann and Bernie Lowe, today unknown outside Philadelphia music, are remembered either as villain or victim. The last chapters, describing Clark’s adjusting the “Bandstand” image to changing musical times, are among the book’s most intriguing.

    The result makes “American Bandstand” unflinching, unfawning yet high-minded critique that Clark, generally no friend of critics, could support. The epilogue essays Clark’s motivations, how he achieved and maintained fame and riches yet still promotes, produces, and hosts. Jackson concludes that it’s what Clark enjoys doing and does best. That, and the dearth of harsh word!s for Clark by anyone in the book, makes this an incisive, fun read for pop culture fans.

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  2. Dave Mock ""...brotherhood is not so wild... says:
    5 of 5 people found the following review helpful:
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    A critical yet fair account of one of TV’s legends, August 14, 1999
    By 
    Dave Mock “”…brotherhood is not so wild… (Rockville Centre, New York United States) –

    John A. Jackson’s book is the most revealing piece written at length about ‘American Bandstand’ and the man who made it tick. Jackson comes off as tough on Clark for the way the host rationalized making records and managing talent while playing that talent’s work on the air. And while Clark has promoted himself and his show as a trailblazer, Jacksons research shows ‘Bandstand’ as much more follower than leader. Yet in the end Jackson gives the show and its longtime host-producer their due for the pivotal role both played in furthering rock as a linchpin of American music. Neither a PR vehicle nor a mantra for Clark-bashers, Jackson’s book is cultural criticism at its best, with the writer knowing how to get out of the way of his subject.

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  3. johnty@acrewllc.com says:
    5 of 6 people found the following review helpful:
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Why was the Director left out?, March 26, 1998
    By 
    johnty@acrewllc.com (Golden, Colorado) –

    There book is more of a profile of Dick Clark than simply a historical account of the show. A must read for fans. I was wondering how My father, Edward J. Yates, who directed American Bandstand for 18 years was not even mentioned. His association with the show predates Clarks. Ed still lives in the Philadelpia area.

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